HomeCOVID-19New Virus is affecting kids in America. Should You be Worried?

New Virus is affecting kids in America. Should You be Worried?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a health advisory to notify clinicians and caregivers about increased interseasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity across parts of the Southern United States.

Due to this increased activity, CDC encourages broader testing for RSV among patients presenting with acute respiratory illness who test negative for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

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This health advisory also serves as a reminder to healthcare personnel, childcare providers, and staff of long-term care facilities to avoid reporting to work while acutely ill – even if they test negative for SARS-CoV-2.

Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) virus, or RSV, is a common respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms. Most people recover in a week or two, but RSV can be serious, especially for infants and older adults.

Read more: San Diego Scientists Working on A Vaccine Against All Coronaviruses. Yes, All of Them

RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) and pneumonia (infection of the lungs) in children younger than 1 year of age in the United States.

RSV is an RNA virus of the genus Orthopneumovirus, family Pneumoviridae, primarily spread via respiratory droplets when a person coughs or sneezes, and through direct contact with a contaminated surface.
 
 
RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children under one year of age in the United States, but, infants, young children, and older adults with chronic medical conditions are highly at risk of severe disease from RSV infection.
 
Each year in the United States, RSV leads to on average approximately 58,000 hospitalizations with 100-500 deaths among children younger than 5 years old and 177,000 hospitalizations with 14,000 deaths among adults aged 65 years or older.
 
 

A nasal swab test best way to identify if your kids have a cold or Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Experts recommend for people to stay safe by practicing proper hygiene and wearing masks.

Stay updated for more news here at the East County Gazette. 

 
 
 
 
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